The Palmarians have not gone away

Business Post by Aaron Rogan Sunday 21st June

The Palmarians have not gone away you know. Now they are showing signs of being caught in the bureaucracy. Just over a year, this issue of the use was covered in the Sunday Times.

Here is more information about them?

https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/category/christian/palmarian-church/

Last week the Palmarians came into focus due to the Roscommon abuse case. Read about Mena Bean Ui Chribin.

https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2015/12/05/mena-bean-ui-chribin-and-the-palmarians/

Is Matthew Lennon a healer or a cult leader?

 

Does he allow people to question his views? We actually published a special
document on the same day as the Sunday Times article came out. We addressed how people can recognise cult-like activity during the conditions prevailing during the Covid-19 pandemic.

https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/…/13/cult-vaccination/

It is the intention of Dialogue Ireland to call Matthew Lennon to discuss whether this healing is in fact a scam. We have received reports that there is no open dialogue and no contrary opinion allowed on his website. He has actively removed comments raising issues about his methodology and message. We want to offer any of those who feel they can’t get through to Matthew Lennon a safe to place to raise issues, leave comments anonymously and send us posts which we will publish while protecting again the identity of our posters. One of the things that happens is that often our post leads to demands for us to take it down or threats to take us to court? The way a group responds indicates the nature of their organisation.

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Cult vaccination

It is not surprising that during times of threats to our safety, health and future that people are more likely to seek answers and comfort from a wide range of sources. The arrival of Covid-19 is a pandemic threat to humanity that is clearly causing stress and fear to many people across the world. It is likely, at this time, that people will be motivated to turn to, or back to, a religious belief that offers answers as well as spiritual and emotional comfort.

This is hardly surprising as there is some evidence that supports the idea that there is a connection between religious faith and emotional happiness and stability. (Ref 1.).

We are well aware that there are online scam artists offering miraculous cures for Covid-19 that can actually cause harm. In the same was there are many cult-like organisations, religious and otherwise, that are also seeking to attract and entrap the unsuspecting online and recruit them for their own purposes.

 

Just as you wouldn’t take any medication

offered to cure Covid-19 without doing some research

it is equally wise to research fully any organisation

that is offering spiritual and emotional comfort.

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Devastation after a Landmark cultist seminar

Illustration: Michael Byers

Devastation after Landmark by “J”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landmark_Worldwide

https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/category/other/landmark/

https://www.landmarkworldwide.com/
I’m a 54-year-old woman, I have 1 brother who is almost 56, he lives with our father. A couple of months ago my brother was introduced to the Landmark by a friend, he subsequently attended the forum A 3-day course and the follow on seminars, he has also registered for the advanced course.
He has never been diagnosed, however, his behaviours are all strongly indicative of a covert narcissistic personality disorder. I was therefore concerned when this course came up, (due to a long history of difficulties with him) and because he was being very secretive about the whole thing, alarm bells were ringing! I found out it was Landmark and became even more concerned when I had done some research, I attempted to explain my feelings which were ignored. Continue reading

How to Be a Dictator by Frank Dikötter review – the cult of personality

 

Charisma, a lust for power, an absence of principles … what links Mao, Mussolini, Stalin, Hitler and other 20th-century dictators?

The Guardian

Sheila Fitzpatrick

Sat 26 Oct 2019

Born in obscurity, frustrated in youth, the dictator rises through accident, patronage or anything except merit to blossom into a fully fledged evil-doer, desperate for the respect and admiration that are wrung from the populace only by skilled PR manipulation. Often feigning modesty, he soon generates a cult that he personally develops. Women and even brave men feel overcome in his presence; schoolchildren chant the praise of the father of the nation; artists and writers deify the great leader. Dictators generally come equipped with an ideology, but since they have no principles, only a lust for power, the process of propagation turns it into a mockery.

Although dictators often fancy themselves as writers or philosophers, they fail to make the grade as intellectuals, and the Little Red Books they produce are travesties. If they are dictators of the left, their attempts at radical reform bring famine and suffering to the population. If dictators of the right, they go to war, with the same consequence of popular suffering, and lead the nation to shameful defeat. They long to be popular, and put great effort into creating that illusion, but it is all fakery. Surrounded by sycophants, they are friendless, lonely and paranoid. Most of them die a dog’s death, but if they somehow manage to avoid this, people only pretend to mourn them. After their death, they are quickly forgotten.

This is the collective portrait that emerges from Frank Dikötter’s book, the eight chapters of which deal with MussoliniHitlerStalinMao ZedongKim Il-sung, Haiti’s “Papa Doc” Duvalier, Romania’s Nicolae Ceauşescu and Ethiopia’s Mengistu Haile Mariam. Despite their fundamental similarities, his dictators do have stylistic differences. Stalin allowed streets and cities to be named after him, while Mao did not. Hitler was a teetotaller and Duvalier a follower of the occult. Kim’s floodlit statue towered over Pyongyang, following the tradition of Stalin statues, but Hitler vetoed the construction of statues of himself (thinking this honour should be reserved for great historical figures), and Ceauşescu and Duvalier felt the same. Some dictators’ enforcers wore brown shirts, others black, and still others had no uniform. Mussolini and Hitler excelled as orators, while Stalin was an undistinguished speaker who never addressed mass rallies. Stalin, Mao and Duvalier wrote poetry, Hitler painted and Mussolini played the violin.

In the chapters on the “big” dictators – Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin and Mao – Dikötter dwells on the cult that developed round them. All of them headed a party that borrowed some of their charisma, and their regimes featured a variety of secret police and enforcers as well as cheerleaders and informers. Ordinary people were encouraged to believe that anything bad was done by subordinates without the dictator’s knowledge (“If only the Duce/Fūhrer/vozhd’ knew”). In fact, the dictators repeatedly made terrible mistakes and appear to have had few if any lasting achievements. With Mao and Stalin, the “dog’s death” trope doesn’t quite fit, but Dikötter runs a modified form of it anyway. Dying, Stalin lay unattended, “soaked in his own urine”, and “one month after his funeral”, his “name vanished from the newspapers”.

Dikötter’s sources are impressive, including 16 archives from nine countries, one of them being the former Soviet Central Party Archive (now renamed RGASPI) in Moscow. Despite this, I did not find the Stalin chapter particularly compelling, no doubt partly because I do not share the author’s view that the cult is the most interesting thing about Stalin. When Dikötter writes that the dry-as-dust Short Course on the History of the All-Union Communist Party, in whose composition Stalin participated, “deified Stalin as the living fount of wisdom”, I wonder if he has actually read it.

For me, the most entertaining chapters of this book were about the dictators I was least familiar with. It is intriguing to read that the remains of Mengistu’s predecessor, Emperor Haile Selassie, were possibly “buried underneath his office, placing his desk right above the corpse”. The stand-out dictator, in terms of entertainment value, is Duvalier, with his personal militia the Tonton Macoutes, who “dressed like gangsters, with shiny blue-serge suits, dark, steel-rimmed glasses and grey homburg hats” for their enforcement duties. Duvalier modelled himself on Baron Samedi, the Vodou spirit of the dead and guardian of cemeteries, and sometimes dressed the part, all in black, with top hat and carrying a cane. Dikötter characterises him as a “dictator’s dictator”, by which I think he means the stripped-down model with “no true party” and without the “pretence of ideology”. Certainly Duvalier has a claim to be the reductio ad absurdum. Continue reading

The Dialogue Ireland archival website has a new domain. www.dialogueireland.ie

 

cult word in a dictionary. cult concept

https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/about/

Due to us losing an old email address renewal notices for our domain for our website:

www.dialogueireland.org were not received. The result was that our domain name was sold and we have to now try to reconstitute it using this domain name:  www.dialogueireland.ie

This may take a few weeks to accomplish but all the material that was on the archival website can be found on our blog https://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/

To contact us please write to   info@dialogueireland.ie

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