Albert Reynolds links with the Moonies

Albert R

The death of Albert Reynolds brings back to mind that after he left office he started participating in Moonie Conferences along with ex President Bush senior, Ted Heath etc. It was not completely clear as to why he participated as the rewards were not that great. You can see from web site and blog that Moon who died in 2012 was a very controversial figure. Read more about the Unification Church/Moonies here.

http://www.dialogueireland.org/dicontent/a2z/unification/background.html

http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/category/christian/unification-church/

 

The author below minimises the issue as he had himself accepted a freebee with the Moonies and is more interested in internal Tory politics

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/edward-heath-sees-bright-side-of-the-moonies-1309411.html

Andrew Brown
Monday 12 August 1996
Edward Heath sees bright side of the Moonies
Andrew Brown on the strange case of the ex-PM and the religious sect

Last week he spoke at a conference sponsored by the Moonies, or the Unification Church as they prefer to be known. For a 20-minute speech on family values in the 21st century he was paid pounds 35,000. The fee is not as generous as it may seem, though: the recipient must not only deliver his own speech, but sit through two days of other people’s speeches on the same subject.
But was it enough to justify an association with the Moonies? Sir Edward has been ferociously attacked for “lending respectability” to the sect. The term “Moonie” has entered the language as meaning a brainwashed, bright- eyed zombie. All the natural instincts of the British are repelled by the thought of lending support to something at once so ridiculous and sinister.
Sun Myung Moon, the founder and leader of the sect, was banned last year from Britain by Michael Howard on the grounds that his presence “would not be conducive to the public good”.
None of this seems to bother Sir Edward at all: last week’s performance was his fourth at a Moonie-sponsored conference. Nor does it bother many of his fellows on the Jobbing World Statesman (retired) circuit. From Al Haig to Albert Reynolds, many of his peers have been happy to deliver platitudes for large sums at conferences organised by the Moonies.
I think they are quite right to do so (and not just because I once benefited from a Moonie freebie when I worked on the Spectator). Apart from the general presumption of innocence which must attach to anyone whom Michael Howard chooses to bully, there are other reasons for regarding Moon and his followers as harmless. Admittedly, their beliefs, so far as they can be understood, are wacky, but that is no reason for cutting them off from society. Sun Myung Moon thinks he is the Messiah; Sir Edward thinks he was a great Prime Minister. Why is one and not the other regarded as insane?
By the standards of Korean religion, Moon is not that wacky at all. South Korea is probably the home of more and wackier religions than anywhere outside the United States, and many are huge by Western standards – Paul Yonghi Cho, a Korean Presbyterian who performed at Wembley Arena last year, claims to have a congregation of 750,000 at his Seoul church. Mr Moon does not, so far as I know, promise that his followers will become miraculously prosperous if they give him money, as many Pentecostalist preachers do.
He does not promise his followers that God will save a family member of the donor’s choice from everlasting damnation for a small consideration, as Morris Cerullo has done.
No doubt the Moonies have caused harm to some of their members and brought misery to some families – though the definitive study of their organisation found that 98 per cent of those converted left within two years. “The really surprising thing is how unshocking most of their morality is,” says William Shaw, a broadcaster who spent a year infiltrating cults and is currently presenting the Cult Fiction series on BBC Radio Five Live. “Most Moonies embrace a morality which would make them acceptable in the most genteel Anglican social.”
But that still leaves open the question of how best to deal with the destructive tendencies that can emerge in any religion. And here, I believe, Sir Edward has a message for the world.
The religions which go mad and sour are not those which are irrational, but those whose organising tendencies are not constantly checked and balanced by contact with the mess and disorder of the world outside. Ostracising them will only encourage them to shrink into a tiny self-contained hate- filled world that finally explodes, like the Aum Shinrikyo cult in Tokyo. And who better to remind the Moonies that they might be boring, ridiculous and irrelevant than the Jobbing World Statesmen (retired) like Sir Edward? Unless perhaps Michael Howard were available.

http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/to-its-critics-the-unification-church-is-a-dangerous-cult-by-clifford-coonan-in-singapore/

UNIFICATION CHURCH THE IRISH CONNECTION
THE UNIFICATION Church founded by the Rev Sun Myung Moon enjoyed some years of growth in Ireland in the 1970s but now has no more than “about 40-50 members” here, said campaign group Dialogue Ireland.
Mike Garde, Director of the group which monitors the activities of religious cults, has been a long- time critic of the “Moonies”.
A major turning point for the church in Ireland, he says, was in 1981 when Donegal schoolteacher Mary Canning testified about the organisation’s questionable recruitment practices.
She was “rescued” and “deprogrammed” after spending two months in the church in San Francisco. Publicity about the case caused then government minister Paddy Harte to describe the organisation as “sinister” and “evil”.
Moon occasionally monitored Irish affairs and in 1997 invited former Taoiseach Albert Reynolds to be keynote speaker at a “peace” conference organised by the church in Washington. Reynolds, who stressed he was not endorsing the church by attending, spoke about his role in the Northern Ireland peace process and told his audience “a happy family makes a happy nation”.
In 2005, Moon visited Dublin for an event dubbed as a regional summit for the church, drawing a large number of members from Britain.

The Unification Church is active in so-called peace activities and many Catholic groups naively give them a platform
They can be found at Unity House, 19 North Great Georges Street, Dublin 1.They are next door neighbours to Senator David Norris.

http://www.unification.ie/index.htm

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10 Responses

  1. Oh Albert RIP did you sacrifice your ethical values and principles for the lure of CASH $ € £
    Along with great statesmanship comes responsibility to do no harm ?
    The Moonies you had to know who organised and funded that event

  2. Did these former political leaders know it was the Moonies who organized the conferences? Did the Moonies use a front name for the events? Just asking.

  3. Very clearly they did and they were paid fees for attending. There seems to be a need for politicians around the world to involve themselves with cults.
    Ted Heath
    Earl Haig
    The Elder Bush
    Sarkosy
    Al Gore
    Bill Clinton
    Nelson Mandela
    Eamon Gilmore
    Jimmy Denihan
    President McAleese
    abnd the list goes on….

  4. Mike, this is an appalling assertion on a great family man.You are giving fodder to the anti- catholic family values in Irish family life. I abhor this article and am seriously offended by it.
    Jack

  5. I am sorry you are offended but he was involved the Moonies on atleast 2 occasions. Just google it yourself. I tried to raise it with him after he left office. It is either true or it is not.

  6. By the way where have you been since March when we needed you in Thurles?

  7. That’s a shocking list of VIPs who got entangled, however briefly in some cases, with the Unification Church or moonies. But I need to ask you Mike, did these VIPs understand the doctrines and psychological operations of the moonies when they undertook to speak at international conferences? Were some of them deceived into thinking the conferences were broadly based and involved individuals and groups not affiliated to the moonies?

  8. Gabby wrote:

    But I need to ask you Mike, did these VIPs understand the doctrines and psychological operations of the moonies when they undertook to speak at international conferences?

    My considered opinion is that it was for the cash, as they had to listen to the most unbelievable nonsense for hours at a time. I do believe they had plenty of information and each would have had access to intelligence briefings on Moon while in office.
    This is the kind of stuff they would have had to listen to.

    http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2009/08/13/learning-to-play-your-sex-organ-by-rev-moon/

    Were some of them deceived into thinking the conferences were broadly based and involved individuals and groups not affiliated to the moonies?

    They tried to recruit students and I travelled for nearly 6 weeks with the Moonies in 1982 to USA, Israel,
    Egypt, Italy, India, Nepal, Hong Kong, China PRC and finally to Korea. They were trying to recruit all the time. There is no such thing as a free lunch.No they were were not broadly based but they paid for influence. Finally they came here in 2005.
    Here is my report:

    http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2009/01/20/background-to-the-november-2005-visit/

  9. So, the Moonies paid high fees for VIP speakers, but did not convert the speakers themselves. Instead they tenaciously tried to convert unsuspecting students and other impressionable individuals who turned up at sessions? Were people like Ted Heath and Mary McAleese ever asked by you or other people who have done courses on New Religious Movements at the University of Aarhus, for example, to reflect on the duplicity of the conference organisers?

    Do you think people like McAleese or Bill Clinton might attend another such conference if the speaking fee were tempting?

  10. Gabby wrote:

    So, the Moonies paid high fees for VIP speakers, but did not convert the speakers themselves.

    No in my opinion they had no interest whatsoever in the the Moonies. They endured the stuff for the money.

    Were people like Ted Heath and Mary McAleese ever asked by you or other people who have done courses on New Religious Movements at the University of Aarhus, for example, to reflect on the duplicity of the conference organisers?

    Never Ted Heath he was long out of office. Also as far as I know Mary McAleese never had any involvement with the Moonies. Mary was first an foremost a deeply committed Evangelical Catholic. You may remember one of her first acts was to take communion at Christchurch with the C of I. She got into the idea of inter Religious dialogue and as a result has given endorsement to the Rigpa Centre in West Cork thinking she was encouraging understanding of Buddhist. She was in fact involved with furthering the aims of a Hindu Tantric misogynistic reality called Lamaism.
    We advised her to step back from this 2009 but she persisted and has no objection to her photographs being up on their web site when I contacted after she left office:

    http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2009/04/07/briefing-document-on-sogyal-rinpoche/

    http://dialogueireland.wordpress.com/2013/06/23/former-president-mary-mcaleeses-role-in-the-promotion-of-sogyal-rimpoche-and-rigpa/

    Instead they tenaciously tried to convert unsuspecting students and other impressionable individuals who turned up at sessions?

    Put simply I believe they were trying to buy influence. Yes they were trying to make converts but that was about it.

    Do you think people like McAleese or Bill Clinton might attend another such conference if the speaking fee were tempting?

    I have no evidence that Mary has attempted to get cash by this means, I believe she is genuinely involved in the Reform of her own church. I see her as misguided and not financially driven. Clinton was the one who gave Scientology a tax deal, but this was started by George Bush Sr. It has given Scientology a gravy train.

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